OpenBSD on the Huawei MateBook X

posted on jul 14th, 2017 with tags hardware, laptops, and openbsd, and last updated on mar 24th, 2019

The Huawei MateBook X is a high-quality 13” ultra-thin laptop with a fanless Core i5 processor. It is obviously biting the design of the Apple 12” MacBook, but it does have some notable improvements such as a slightly larger screen, a more usable keyboard with adequate key travel, and 2 USB-C ports.

It also uses more standard PC components than the MacBook, such as a PS/2-connected keyboard, Intel WiFi card, etc., so its OpenBSD compatibility is quite good.

huawei matebook on desk running openbsd

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OpenBSD (not) on the Surface Pro 4

posted on jan 2nd, 2017 with tags hardware, laptops, and openbsd, and last updated on dec 30th, 2016

I recently had access to a Surface Pro 4 and tried to boot OpenBSD on it. It did not go well, so I am just putting this here for posterity.

The 2016 Surface Pro 4 is basically just a keyboard-less x86 (Core i5 on the model I had) tablet with some tightly integrated (read: not upgradeable) components. Its optional Surface Type Cover is just a USB-attached keyboard and trackpad, which magnetically secure to the bottom of the device.

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OpenBSD on the Chromebook Pixel (2015)

posted on aug 26th, 2016 with tags laptops and openbsd, and last updated on aug 22nd, 2016

chromebook pixel running openbsd showing three terminal windows

The Chromebook Pixel LS (2015) has an Intel Core i7 processor (Broadwell) at 2.4Ghz, 16Gb of RAM, a 2560x1700 400-nit IPS screen (239ppi), and Intel 802.11ac wireless. It has a Kingston 64Gib flash chip, of which about 54Gib can be used by OpenBSD when dual-booting with a 1Gb Chrome OS partition.

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Remotely Installing OpenBSD on a Headless Linux Server

posted on sep 12th, 2014 with tags linux and openbsd

I recently activated a new dedicated server that came preinstalled with Linux, as the hosting provider didn’t support OpenBSD. Since they also didn’t provide an IP-based KVM without purchasing a dedicated hardware module (though most of the IP-KVMs I’ve used recently require interfacing with some terrible Java-based monstrosity anyway), I needed a way to remotely install OpenBSD over the running Linux server.

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Adventures in Toronto

posted on jun 9th, 2013 with tags openbsd and travel

I spent a week in Toronto, Canada attending the OpenBSD t2k13 hackathon hosted at the University of Toronto. While these events are put on every year in random places, I have not attended one since c2k7 in Calgary back in 2007. I tried to go to the Portugal hackathon last year but my travel plans got all screwed up.

I wrote about the technical details of what I accomplished at this event at the OpenBSD Journal so I won’t duplicate it here, but it was a fairly productive week for me. I remember at c2k7 I didn’t really have much to work on and felt out of place but this time I had more things to do than I had time.

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Counting Pull-ups

posted on apr 25th, 2012 with tags fitbit, openbsd, and ruby

I’m a big fan of my Fitbit pedometer because it does most of its work without any interaction. I clip it onto my pocket and it counts my steps and flights of stairs as I walk throughout the day, then automatically, wirelessly uploads the data to Fitbit’s website whenever I’m within range of its USB dongle plugged into one of my computers. The whole thing works without having to think about it or plug anything in. The battery lasts for about a week, and when it finally runs low, my low battery notifier sends a message to my phone through Pushover telling me to put it on its charger for a few hours.

To add to my step data, I got a Withings scale last year which logs my weight and BMI on Withings’ website automatically every time I step on the scale. Fitbit’s website syncs this data from Withings, so now I’m able to track my steps, flights of stairs, weight, and BMI, all automatically, all on Fitbit’s website. I use this data mainly as a motivation to walk more and not get fat, just as my Wii Fit motivated me to exercise every day by tracking all of the data. When I know my Fitbit is counting my steps, I’ll avoid hopping on the bus or train to get home and just walk. A few times I’ve left the house and upon noticing my Fitbit wasn’t there, walked all the way back and got it just so the steps I was going to take that day would “count”.

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Properly stopping a SIP flood

posted on apr 11th, 2010 with tags asterisk, networking, openbsd, ruby, security, and voip

At about 9am yesterday morning, I noticed on my server monitor that the CPU utilization of one of my servers was abnormally high, in addition to a sustained 1mbit/sec of inbound traffic and 2mbits/sec of outbound traffic. syslog messages from Asterisk showed it to be a SIP brute force attack, so I dropped the offending IP (an Amazon EC2 instance IP) into /etc/idiots to block it and went back to my work.

A while later, I noticed the traffic still hadn’t died down, so I reported the incident to Amazon and my server’s network provider. No luck on either front; Amazon just sent back a form reply stating the incident was forwarded to the EC2 instance’s owner (yeah, seriously) and the network provider said they wouldn’t bother adding an ACL to their border equipment unless it was needed to protect their entire network. With the IP blocked on my server, the CPU utilization had died down and it was no longer sending out reply traffic, but I was worried about the inbound garbage traffic counting towards the server’s monthly bandwidth cap.

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My history with OpenBSD

posted on jul 30th, 2008 with tags openbsd

I received an e-mail asking me how I got started with OpenBSD, so I thought I’d write the answer here in case anyone else wanted to read it.

I started using OpenBSD in 1998 (version 2.3 or 2.4) to host a BBS that I was running. I chose OpenBSD because of its security record and because I was getting fed up with Linux (Slackware) at the time. I think the machine was a Pentium 75 or something, and OpenBSD worked quite well on it. During the course of building the BBS, I had to install some 3rd party software, so I got interested in OpenBSD’s ports system to make installation of that software cleaner. I submitted some ports to the ports@ mailing list and got them committed by other developers. I tested others’ ports and supplied feedback where I could. I hadn’t done much unix development back then, so writing simple makefiles for ports was an easy way to get involved.

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