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June 2018

Fetching node status from AirPort APs

posted to writings on jun 12th, 2018 with tags apple, nerd, netbsd, and ruby

Seven years ago, I hacked together some code to update my Ecobee WiFi thermostat temperature depending on whether I was home. While my newer Ecobee thermostat has room occupancy sensors that make this tracking automatic, back then I had to poll my WiFi access point through SNMP to look for my phone's MAC address in its table of associated clients.

Recently I needed to do something similar to pass to my Z-Wave controller but it seems that Apple has removed SNMP support from its Airport Extreme firmware some time ago.

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November 2016

The 2016 MacBook Pro

posted to writings on nov 8th, 2016 with tags apple, laptops, mac, and nerd, last updated on nov 3rd, 2016

I've been using an 11" MacBook Air as my primary computer for six years. It's a great computer that satisfied a lot of requirements I had for a laptop: thin, lightweight, small form factor, excellent keyboard and touchpad, mostly silent, but not an Atom or Core M processor.

I've done a lot on this little computer, like compiling and maintaining an Android ROM, writing the Rails, iOS, and Android apps for Pushover, creating Lobsters, recording and editing 40 episodes of Garbage, and lots of OpenBSD development.

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August 2011

An Ecobee Automation Hack

posted to writings on aug 29th, 2011 with tags apple, ecobee, nerd, and ruby

I've had an Ecobee thermostat in my house and now in my apartment for a number of years. It's a touchscreen thermostat equipped with 802.11 wireless that can be remotely adjusted and monitored from Ecobee's website as well as iPhone and Android applications. While the expected use case might be monitoring the temperature of one's home while at work, I often lazily use the phone applications while at home when I'm too cold to get out of bed to turn the heat up. Also, while Ecobee's website touts its "green" features and energy savings, working from home has always meant being unable to use automated work/home schedules and instead having to hold the same temperature all day. With some Ruby code and SNMP, I am now able to automatically detect when I am home and when I leave the apartment, and adjust the temperature automatically.

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